TEEN ARCHER

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Finished up “Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story” this weekend while I was traveling. I’m not going to attempt to give it a comprehensive review, because I don’t have the time or the inclination, but I will say that if you consider yourself a DFW fan, then it’s definitely worth your while. Here are some bullet points.
I’ve read every single primary DFW thing I can get my hands on (with the exception of “Everything and More,” which I was too math-tarded to grasp), and I’ve read a lot about DFW, and I still learned a ton. 
For the most part, D.T. Max did an excellent job of making himself transparent and just telling the story. I could see a younger/less-experienced/less secure writer trying to make the book about her-/himself and trying to out-DFW DFW, but Max just stuck to the facts. 
On the other hand, he maybe hewed a little too close to the facts, and often I found myself wishing he’d dug deeper. Whether it was about Wallace’s personal life or his work, I wanted MORE. But maybe that’s for another author and another book. 
The hardcover edition wasn’t exactly rife with copyediting errors, but there were enough to make it a rocky read for this former copyeditor. But I’m a weird audience, and this is a first edition, so I’m sure those will get addressed in subsequent printings. 
It made me miss DFW terribly and want to read everything again. 
If you’re still on the fence, perhaps this excerpt will help you make up your mind. 

Finished up “Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story” this weekend while I was traveling. I’m not going to attempt to give it a comprehensive review, because I don’t have the time or the inclination, but I will say that if you consider yourself a DFW fan, then it’s definitely worth your while. Here are some bullet points.

  • I’ve read every single primary DFW thing I can get my hands on (with the exception of “Everything and More,” which I was too math-tarded to grasp), and I’ve read a lot about DFW, and I still learned a ton. 
  • For the most part, D.T. Max did an excellent job of making himself transparent and just telling the story. I could see a younger/less-experienced/less secure writer trying to make the book about her-/himself and trying to out-DFW DFW, but Max just stuck to the facts. 
  • On the other hand, he maybe hewed a little too close to the facts, and often I found myself wishing he’d dug deeper. Whether it was about Wallace’s personal life or his work, I wanted MORE. But maybe that’s for another author and another book. 
  • The hardcover edition wasn’t exactly rife with copyediting errors, but there were enough to make it a rocky read for this former copyeditor. But I’m a weird audience, and this is a first edition, so I’m sure those will get addressed in subsequent printings. 
  • It made me miss DFW terribly and want to read everything again. 

If you’re still on the fence, perhaps this excerpt will help you make up your mind. 

  1. countstarsbycandlelight reblogged this from teenarcher and added:
    I just finished this. No time (or, honestly, motivation) to wrie anything somewhat resembling a real review, but I’ll...
  2. grenadeparty reblogged this from hermitologist and added:
    Can’t wait to pick this up!
  3. thiscozyskull reblogged this from hermitologist
  4. hermitologist reblogged this from teenarcher and added:
    This is sitting in my reading queue, taunting me. I might have to push a few things aside and just dive in after reading...
  5. teenarcher posted this