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TEEN ARCHER

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On point. 
mackro:

How Not To Sound Like A Fool When Talking About Mastering, Vinyl, CDs, etc.
Today, I posted a mini-rant on Facebook around the old, current and perpetual audio medium war. It was inspired by a posting by Oliver Wang on his great blog Soul Sides. Here is that entry. I agree with the entry, but the resulting comments from it on various Facebook threads exhibited that there are certain technical issues that are still misunderstood by many. I posted most of the following off the top of my head earlier today, and I was kinda blown away by the positive response. So here it is, with some slight changes and amendments to make it a little less sloppy
Mastering vinyl from digital sources doesn’t universally suck, nor does it suck at all. It’s the majority of people who have no clue and/or no care for what they’re doing while mastering modern vinyl that suck. The issues that make these vinyl issues suck may easily be a different issue than any digital source or the vinyl part altogether. It could be the player. It’s often cheap headphones or speakers.
CDs and MP3s are not the same thing — especially 128kbps encoded MP3s. If you equate the two in an argument about “digital” media sucking, you’re a goddamn fool.
Actually, any debate about the “sound quality” of a certain medium is doomed from the start. “Sound quality” is far too vague a term, yet it’s a phrase that’s all too easy to blurt out. If it’s ever brought up in an argument, either clarify the phrase, or end the argument.
High-end open reel-to-reel tape has a better frequency range than both vinyl and CD. If you want to brag about Massive Frequency Superiority, show off your 2-inch tape machine instead of your turntable or high-end CD/DVD player.
Vinyl does not have a wider frequency range than CD audio, for practical purposes. Vinyl can handle higher frequencies than 20kHz, but these are frequencies humans can’t hear. Vinyl does more poorly with low frequencies — circa 20Hz — than CD because of rumble. That’s not vinyl’s fault. That’s your turntable cartridge’s fault. More to the point, it’s the turntable owner who needs to get a more boomin’ cartridge. Either way, CD audio frequency ranges are pretty much the same as vinyl, but without any contact-media complications
Vinyl’s technical advantage over CDs is its resolution. (Think of frequency range as the range of the color palette, and resolution as how detailed and life-like the painting looks.) Vinyl does not quantize its sound reproduction, which CDs and digital sources do, by definition. However, vinyl is only superior in resolution if the mastering source has equal or higher resolution, such as high-end reel-to-reel tape. That said, that same sound source as uncompressed 16-bit or preferably 24-bit digital audio is barely audibly inferior to reel-to-reel to most people. If the digital source is a low-bit-rate MP3, that MP3 will almost certainly sound better than the vinyl mastered from it.
A vinyl release with minor flaws can easily sound inferior to a well-done CD.
A CD release with minor flaws can easily sound inferior to a well-done vinyl release.
In the case of the latter two, you may blame the artist, the mixer, the studio, the mastering engineer, the record label, whatever. But don’t blame the medium.
Replace “vinyl”, “turntable”, “cartridge”, and “rumble” above with "cassette", "cassette deck", "playback head", and "tape hiss" respectively, and you have all you need to know about cassettes vs. CD as well — more or less.
Most people like the packaging and feel of holding a vinyl release than a CD release or MP3 release, for reasons of rumination, visual art aesthetics, and ergonomics. This is a perfectly valid opinion to uphold. It is no more than an opinion. Yet, that opinion is holding major economic sway these days, whether you like it or not. And "sound quality" has zero to do with vinyl’s high media profile today — except for when you buy and complain about horribly mastered vinyl, in which case go to the first bulletpoint.

On point. 

mackro:

How Not To Sound Like A Fool When Talking About Mastering, Vinyl, CDs, etc.

Today, I posted a mini-rant on Facebook around the old, current and perpetual audio medium war. It was inspired by a posting by Oliver Wang on his great blog Soul Sides. Here is that entry. I agree with the entry, but the resulting comments from it on various Facebook threads exhibited that there are certain technical issues that are still misunderstood by many. I posted most of the following off the top of my head earlier today, and I was kinda blown away by the positive response. So here it is, with some slight changes and amendments to make it a little less sloppy

  • Mastering vinyl from digital sources doesn’t universally suck, nor does it suck at all. It’s the majority of people who have no clue and/or no care for what they’re doing while mastering modern vinyl that suck. The issues that make these vinyl issues suck may easily be a different issue than any digital source or the vinyl part altogether. It could be the player. It’s often cheap headphones or speakers.
  • CDs and MP3s are not the same thing — especially 128kbps encoded MP3s. If you equate the two in an argument about “digital” media sucking, you’re a goddamn fool.
  • Actually, any debate about the “sound quality” of a certain medium is doomed from the start. “Sound quality” is far too vague a term, yet it’s a phrase that’s all too easy to blurt out. If it’s ever brought up in an argument, either clarify the phrase, or end the argument.
  • High-end open reel-to-reel tape has a better frequency range than both vinyl and CD. If you want to brag about Massive Frequency Superiority, show off your 2-inch tape machine instead of your turntable or high-end CD/DVD player.
  • Vinyl does not have a wider frequency range than CD audio, for practical purposes. Vinyl can handle higher frequencies than 20kHz, but these are frequencies humans can’t hear. Vinyl does more poorly with low frequencies — circa 20Hz — than CD because of rumble. That’s not vinyl’s fault. That’s your turntable cartridge’s fault. More to the point, it’s the turntable owner who needs to get a more boomin’ cartridge. Either way, CD audio frequency ranges are pretty much the same as vinyl, but without any contact-media complications
  • Vinyl’s technical advantage over CDs is its resolution. (Think of frequency range as the range of the color palette, and resolution as how detailed and life-like the painting looks.) Vinyl does not quantize its sound reproduction, which CDs and digital sources do, by definition. However, vinyl is only superior in resolution if the mastering source has equal or higher resolution, such as high-end reel-to-reel tape. That said, that same sound source as uncompressed 16-bit or preferably 24-bit digital audio is barely audibly inferior to reel-to-reel to most people. If the digital source is a low-bit-rate MP3, that MP3 will almost certainly sound better than the vinyl mastered from it.
  • A vinyl release with minor flaws can easily sound inferior to a well-done CD.
  • A CD release with minor flaws can easily sound inferior to a well-done vinyl release.
  • In the case of the latter two, you may blame the artist, the mixer, the studio, the mastering engineer, the record label, whatever. But don’t blame the medium.
  • Replace “vinyl”, “turntable”, “cartridge”, and “rumble” above with "cassette", "cassette deck", "playback head", and "tape hiss" respectively, and you have all you need to know about cassettes vs. CD as well — more or less.
  • Most people like the packaging and feel of holding a vinyl release than a CD release or MP3 release, for reasons of rumination, visual art aesthetics, and ergonomics. This is a perfectly valid opinion to uphold. It is no more than an opinion. Yet, that opinion is holding major economic sway these days, whether you like it or not. And "sound quality" has zero to do with vinyl’s high media profile today — except for when you buy and complain about horribly mastered vinyl, in which case go to the first bulletpoint.
If you don’t already have this, or if you think you don’t like Bob Seger, burn some bandwidth and cop this. It’s truly fantastic. 
doomandgloomfromthetomb:

Never Mind The Bullets: Bob Seger, 1966 - 1974
Summer is a-coming in, so it’s time to re-up this compilation of early, criminally out-of-print Seger! It’s raw, it’s garagey, it’s so good. And I still think this is the best photograph of all time. 

If you don’t already have this, or if you think you don’t like Bob Seger, burn some bandwidth and cop this. It’s truly fantastic. 

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

Never Mind The Bullets: Bob Seger, 1966 - 1974

Summer is a-coming in, so it’s time to re-up this compilation of early, criminally out-of-print Seger! It’s raw, it’s garagey, it’s so good. And I still think this is the best photograph of all time. 

First day out with a borrowed 40D. Just learning my way around this thing. 

Thrilled to have seen Thou twice in 24 hours. One of the most earnest, honest, talented, and inspiring bands around. These pictures are from their 4/20 at Toys in Babeland in Oakland. Taken with an iPhone 4s and an olloclip.

productiveouts:

Yeah, this podcast is dedicated to all the teachers that told us we’d never get past episode fitty. It’s all good, baby.

- It was all a dream: Not Jose Mota welcomes back the baseball season (0:00-7:12)

- We read your crazy-ass emails (7:45-28:45)

- Salt and Pepa and Animals as Leaders up in the limousine (29:2-34:15)

- Every Wednesday night, Evan Funk Davies, not Marley Marl (34:15-53:55)

- Baseball talk til my tape popped (54:42-1:20:11)

  • BASEDBALL IS BACK
  • Mike Trout is rich (and very good at baseball)
  • Miguel Cabrera is also rich (and good at baseball) and the Tigers are dumb
  • DICKSTAND
  • Our respective divisional picks, wild card teams, NL & AL champs & WS champ

- Peace to Puig DCult Leader, KWC (1:21:05-1:27:55)

And if you don’t know, now you know…

endofalldoubt:

Short film entitled "A Flower" from 1971, by a 15-year old Lars von Trier. YouTube.

(via keyframedaily)

I highly recommend you follow my friend Paul’s new tumblarr. Fascinating stuff. 

cemlurk:

Back in September 2011, I was on road trip across the country, and we stopped to pay our respects to DJ Screw.  To date, this continues to be the most challenging difficult cemetery to find to date for me, but super rad and rewarding to find it, and to be there.  This is from what i wrote on my travel blog back then.  You can find the original posts here and here … Famous for the Houston rap scene, but surprisingly, he’s from and buried in Smithville, Texas - a town in the cuts less than an hour south of Austin.  I had a fairly difficult time pinning down exactly the location of the graveyard he was buried in - just had a name of the cemetery and the name of the county.  With some research, I found the location of the cemetery on the map, and worked out some directions to the street.

We got off the highway, and ended up making a wrong turn and ending up in downtown Smithville.  A cute throwback town with a bunch of antique stores, Smithville was used for shooting a number of movies - Tree of Life most recently.  Confirmed my directions with a postal worker we found on Main Street.  Also on Main St was a distribution center for essentials to help those displaced by the wildfires that ripped through Texas during their significant drought.

Back on the road to find the cemetery, we ended up on a county road that turned into a dirt road and then back into a real road again.  We passed a sign for Cunningham Cemetery, but the sign pointed to the field across the street where there was no road.  We turned around and looked at the other side, and there was an arrow on that sign that also pointed to the field.  Confused, we kept driving along the road, as it turned to gravel again.  After a mile or so of driving on gravel, under an ominous sky, we turned back around to explore again at the sign.  There were two driveways, one going to a residence, and another didn’t appear to go anywhere.  Against our better judgment, we drove up to the house so I could ask them where the cemetery was.  I was careful to keep my hands where they could be seen, and tried to look the least sketchy I could, and hollered towards the house, asking if anyone was home.  Did that a couple times, and we got no response, so we turned around and tried the other entrance.

We unlatched the cattle gate to get our car up the driveway, and we drove up a grass and dirt driveway with cactus lining the outside of the driveway.  A shitload of large grasshoppers hopped out of the grass as our car approached - some away from our car, and a handful INTO our car.  We came to another cattle gate, and drove a distance further and the cemetery finally came into view.  We had to open and get through a third cattle grate, and were finally there.

The cemetery was pretty small and very country, including handwritten headstones.  Was not hard to to find Screw’s stone.  Even if the text on the grave didn’t give it away, it was the only grave that had an empty bottle of cough syrup at it.  Luckily for everyone involved, we had brought our own cough syrup, and poured a little out for Robert Davis.  RIP

- Paul

new amp day.

new amp day.

STAY mural, Oakland, CA  (at Kimballs Carnival)

STAY mural, Oakland, CA (at Kimballs Carnival)

I sang on this tribute to extreme rebel trillionaire Max Stone. You can download it (and the rest of the Big Red Boots album) here. (I guess I played some bass on this record too?) 

darksilenceinsuburbia:

generic—eric:

Lana Turner in “The Prodigal” 1955

darksilenceinsuburbia:

generic—eric:

Lana Turner in “The Prodigal” 1955

(Source: generic-art, via keyframedaily)